Property Condition Assessment / Property Condition Report

August 8, 2013

Property Condition Assessment, also called a Property Condition Report, is an evaluation of the capital expenses that will likely be required to maintain an asset in the short- and long-term.

The standard scope of work for the Property Condition Assessment is defined by ASTM E2018 and includes a walk-through survey of the property to assess the condition of building systems, components and other property improvements, and interviews and documents review regarding the age and condition of property improvements. The Property Condition Report includes tables of the short-term capital expenses (Immediate Repairs Table) and long-term capital expenses (Replacement Reserves Table).
PCAs can help lenders or buyers understand how the condition of the building and site improvements will impact the asset’s financial performance.

Learn more about Property Condition Assessments 
Watch a video about Property Condition Assessments


ASTM E2018-08 Standard – Property Condition Assessments

July 10, 2013

The ASTM E2018-08 Standard is the industry standard for baseline Property Condition Assessments. Fully named “ASTM E2018-08 Standard Guide for Property Condition Assessments: Baseline Property Condition Assessment Process,” the Standard outlines the purpose and scope of the Property Condition Assessment including the walk-through survey, document reviews and interviews, as well as the contents of the Property Condition Report. According to ASTM E2018, the goal of the Property Condition Assessment is to identify and communicate physical deficiencies of the subject property.

The ASTM E2018-08 Standard was created by the American Society for Testing and Materials (now simply ASTM International). The E2018 Standard was originally published in 1999 and updated in 2001 and 2008 (now called E2018-08). The standard is reviewed and revised by the ASTM Committee E50 on Environmental Risk Assessment, Risk Management and Corrective Action.


Historical Recognized Environmental Condition- HREC

June 18, 2013

A Historical Recognized Environmental Condition is defined by ASTM as “an environmental condition which in the past would have been considered a recognized environmental condition, but which may or may not be considered a recognized environmental condition currently.” The determination of whether an environmental condition is a recognized environmental condition (REC) or a historical recognized environmental condition (HREC) lies with the environmental professional, and depends upon how the condition impacts the current or future use of the property. A release that was remediated and given regulatory closure may be considered an HREC unless it is determined to have a significant current or future impact on the property, at which point the environmental professional may deem it a REC.


De Minimis Conditions

June 11, 2013

De minimis conditions are defined by ASTM as environmental conditions that “generally do not present a threat to human health or the environment and that generally would not be the subject of an enforcement action if brought to the attention of appropriate governmental agencies.” A de minimis condition is not considered a recognized environmental condition. An example of a de minimis condition might be a small, superficial spill of oil that is not anticipated to cause a significant concern.


Business Environmental Risk

June 6, 2013

Business Environmental Risk is characterized by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) as “a risk which can have a material environmental or environmentally-driven impact on the business associated with the current or planned use of a parcel of commercial real estate, not necessarily limited to those environmental issues required to be investigated in this practice (ESA, ASTM E1527-05). Consideration of business environmental risk issues may involve addressing one or more non-scope considerations.”

The conventional non-scope environmental business risk items alluded to include:

  • Asbestos
  • Lead Paint
  • Lead in Drinking Water
  • Radon
  • Wetlands
  • Ecological resources
  • Endangered Species
  • Cultural and historic resources
  • Regulatory compliance
  • Industrial Hygiene
  • Health and Safety
  • Indoor air quality
  • Biological agents
  • Mold

Business Environmental Risk is by definition very broad and can encompass many types of risk, not limited to the above list.


ASTM E1527-05 Standard – Phase I Environmental Site Assessments

May 22, 2013

The ASTM E1527-05 Standard is the industry standard used for Phase I Environmental Site Assessments. Fully named “ASTM E1527-05 Standard Practice for Environmental Site Assessments: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment Process,” the Standard outlines the purpose and use of the Phase I ESA as well as the scope of work to be conducted, including: records review (historical and governmental records); site reconnaissance (inspection of the property and adjacent sites); interviews (with owners and occupants and local government officials); evaluation and report preparation.

The ASTM E1527-05 Standard was formed by the American Society for Testing and Materials (now ASTM International), and is designed to meet the EPA’s condition for All Appropriate Inquiry for environmental due diligence. The E1527 Standard for Phase I ESAs has gone through many versions, the latest being finalized in 2005. The standard is reviewed and revised by the ASTM Committee E50 on Environmental Risk Assessment, Risk Management and Corrective Action.


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