OCC Handbook/ Commercial Real Estate Booklet

September 10, 2013

The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (“OCC”) oversees a system of national banks and federal savings associations involved in Commercial Real Estate and Construction Lending, assuring that these institutions are safe, sound, competitive, and capable of providing for the banking needs of customers as best as possible.

The OCC issues a handbook, which according to the OCC Handbook itself,” The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency’s (OCC) Comptroller’s Handbook booklet, “Commercial Real Estate Lending,” provides guidance for bank examiners and bankers on commercial real estate (CRE) lending activities.”

It specifically cites risk, “The booklet addresses the risks inherent in CRE lending as well as risks unique to specific lending activities and property types. Also discussed are supervisory expectations and regulatory requirements for prudent risk management. “

The Comptroller’s Handbook was updated in August of 2013. For further information regarding the  updates, visit

http://www.partneresi.com/resources/occ-handbook-commercial-real-estate-booklet.php

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Freddie Mac Property Condition Report

September 4, 2013

Freddie Mac and its DUS Lenders have specific requirements for their version of the Property Condition Report. The Freddie Mac Property Condition Report scope of work, as specified in the Freddie Mac Multifamily Seller/Servicer Guide and Chapter 15 Engineering and Property Condition Requirements, is similar to an ASTM E2018 Property Condition Assessment, but also has distinct differences.

The DUS Guide currently requires the Lender to provide a termite inspection report or a termite bond or other evidence of adequate coverage. The Lender is not required to submit a termite inspection report or bond if the project construction is steel or concrete and the Lender provides documentation of such fact. If the project construction is not steel or concrete, then in lieu of a termite report or bond the Lender must submit one of the following: –

-A letter from the current pest control company providing regular service to the Property, stating that the Property has been regularly treated to prevent termite and other wood boring insect infestation and, to its knowledge, there is no current infestation, or

-A letter from a qualified engineer (which must be the same engineer performing the physical needs assessment) indicating that there is no evidence of termite or wood boring insect infestation. In order to be a “qualified” engineer, such engineer must have completed termite inspection training and certification and must provide evidence of such.

– See more at: http://www.partneresi.com/fannie-mae-freddie-mac.php

 

See more at: http://www.partneresi.com/fannie-mae-freddie-mac.php


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